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Uncas CollarUncas Monument-Lasting

Uncas Wampum Collar (c. 1638)

This wampum collar belonged to Mohegan Sachem Uncas (1598-1683), a “Friend of the English.” The two white triangles show the 17th c. division between Mohegan and Pequot villages. This is the only known New England wampum to continuously remain in Native American hands since the 1600s. 

Displayed at Tantaquidgeon Museum, America’s Oldest Native-Owned and Operated Museum

Flying Bird Beltpic_fidelia2

Flying Bird Belt (c. 1770s)

This belt was worn by 3 Mohegan women: Martha Uncas (1769-1859), Flying Bird (Jees Bodernosh-shor/Fidelia Fielding (1827-1908), and Medicine Woman Gladys Tantaquidgeon (1899-2005). The longevity of these three women allowed the tribe to pass on & preserve ancient Mohegan stories. Flying Bird was the last fluent speaker of Connecticut’s first language, Mohegan-Pequot, which is now undergoing restoration and being taught to Mohegan tribal youth.

Displayed at Tantaquidgeon Museum, America’s Oldest Native-Owned and Operated Museum
Occum boxSamson Occum

Samson Occum Box (c. 1785)

This elm bark box shows Connecticut’s NT by the Mohegan educator, Rev. Samson Occom (1723-1792). The pipes on top represent the tribes of Occom’s Brothertown Movement that traveled from CT to NY. Curved lines with arrows show their east-west path. Occom also traveled east to England to raise funds to found Dartmouth College as an Indian school. Occom was educated by Rev. Wheelock in Columbia, CT.

Displayed at Tantaquidgeon Museum, America’s Oldest Native-Owned and Operated Museum

Coin symbolBasket 8

Dome Copper Disk (1600s)

This colonial-era copper disk shows Mohegan four-dome symbol, seen in the Mohegan tribal logo. It represents the dome of the sky and the four directions, as well as the four winds that call the spirits and guide the traveler. Because of its relationship to the sky, this dome is often painted blue. Connecticut’s early territories can be seen in the map.

Displayed at Tantaquidgeon Museum, America’s Oldest Native-Owned and Operated Museum
mortar and pestleCorn Kernels

Mohegan Mortar & Pestle (1700s)

This Mohegan mortar and pestle was used to grind eight-row flint corn. The mortar’s base is a classic Mohegan design that reflects the dome of the sky, the back of the turtle, and the shape of Mohegan wigwams.

Displayed at Tantaquidgeon Museum, America’s Oldest Native-Owned and Operated Museum

ShantokwareFire

Shantok Pottery (1600s)

Shantok pottery is made from shell-tempered clay, and its designs honor women. Corn, bean, and meat soup, known as succotash, was boiled in these pots. Mohegan families still continue the tradition of making succotash. We believe corn feeds the body and the spirit.

Displayed at Tantaquidgeon Museum, America’s Oldest Native-Owned and Operated Museum

arrow headsfishing hook

Ancient Projectile Points (6,000 B.P. to 2,000 B.P.)

These projectile points from Mohegan territory date back thousands of years. They were used to hunt deer, catch fish, and gather clams to supplement food from our gardens. Corn dates back 10,000 years. We still hold a summer Wigwam festival to honor corn.

Displayed at Tantaquidgeon Museum, America’s Oldest Native-Owned and Operated Museum
clubWar Club

Ball Club (1600s)

This ball club was used by Mohegans and other Native American warriors in New England during the 1600’s. Ball clubs are traditionally made from the ball root of a maple tree. Other clubs are also made from the roots of trees that looked like an animals for ceremony or battle. A wolf club made by Chief Matahga is carried by our sitting Mohegan Chief .

Displayed at Tantaquidgeon Museum, America’s Oldest Native-Owned and Operated Museum

Wolf Spoon1909 Mohegan

Wolf Spoon

Mohegan means wolf people. This wolf-headed spoon was held by Lucy Occum Tantaquidgeon (1733-1830), her daughter, Lucy Teecomwas (1753-1834), and her daughter, Cynthia Hoscott (1778-1855). These women offered their land for the founding of Mohegan Church in 1831. During the 1830’s Federal Indian Removal era, the Connecticut congressional delegation opposed Indian removal including the Cherokee Trail of Tears.

Displayed at Tantaquidgeon Museum, America’s Oldest Native-Owned and Operated Museum

Uncas CollarUncas Monument-Lasting

Uncas Wampum Collar (c. 1638)

This wampum collar belonged to Mohegan Sachem Uncas (1598-1683), a “Friend of the English.” The two white triangles show the 17th c. division between Mohegan and Pequot villages. This is the only known New England wampum to continuously remain in Native American hands since the 1600s. 

Displayed at Tantaquidgeon Museum, America’s Oldest Native-Owned and Operated Museum

Flying Bird Beltpic_fidelia2

Flying Bird Belt (c. 1770s)

This belt was worn by 3 Mohegan women: Martha Uncas (1769-1859), Flying Bird (Jees Bodernosh-shor/Fidelia Fielding (1827-1908), and Medicine Woman Gladys Tantaquidgeon (1899-2005). The longevity of these three women allowed the tribe to pass on & preserve ancient Mohegan stories. Flying Bird was the last fluent speaker of Connecticut’s first language, Mohegan-Pequot, which is now undergoing restoration and being taught to Mohegan tribal youth.

Displayed at Tantaquidgeon Museum, America’s Oldest Native-Owned and Operated Museum
Occum boxSamson Occum

Samson Occum Box (c. 1785)

This elm bark box shows Connecticut’s NT by the Mohegan educator, Rev. Samson Occom (1723-1792). The pipes on top represent the tribes of Occom’s Brothertown Movement that traveled from CT to NY. Curved lines with arrows show their east-west path. Occom also traveled east to England to raise funds to found Dartmouth College as an Indian school. Occom was educated by Rev. Wheelock in Columbia, CT.

Displayed at Tantaquidgeon Museum, America’s Oldest Native-Owned and Operated Museum

Coin symbolBasket 8

Dome Copper Disk (1600s)

This colonial-era copper disk shows Mohegan four-dome symbol, seen in the Mohegan tribal logo. It represents the dome of the sky and the four directions, as well as the four winds that call the spirits and guide the traveler. Because of its relationship to the sky, this dome is often painted blue. Connecticut’s early territories can be seen in the map.

Displayed at Tantaquidgeon Museum, America’s Oldest Native-Owned and Operated Museum
mortar and pestleCorn Kernels

Mohegan Mortar & Pestle (1700s)

This Mohegan mortar and pestle was used to grind eight-row flint corn. The mortar’s base is a classic Mohegan design that reflects the dome of the sky, the back of the turtle, and the shape of Mohegan wigwams.

Displayed at Tantaquidgeon Museum, America’s Oldest Native-Owned and Operated Museum

ShantokwareFire

Shantok Pottery (1600s)

Shantok pottery is made from shell-tempered clay, and its designs honor women. Corn, bean, and meat soup, known as succotash, was boiled in these pots. Mohegan families still continue the tradition of making succotash. We believe corn feeds the body and the spirit.

Displayed at Tantaquidgeon Museum, America’s Oldest Native-Owned and Operated Museum

arrow headsfishing hook

Ancient Projectile Points (6,000 B.P. to 2,000 B.P.)

These projectile points from Mohegan territory date back thousands of years. They were used to hunt deer, catch fish, and gather clams to supplement food from our gardens. Corn dates back 10,000 years. We still hold a summer Wigwam festival to honor corn.

Displayed at Tantaquidgeon Museum, America’s Oldest Native-Owned and Operated Museum
clubWar Club

Ball Club (1600s)

This ball club was used by Mohegans and other Native American warriors in New England during the 1600’s. Ball clubs are traditionally made from the ball root of a maple tree. Other clubs are also made from the roots of trees that looked like an animals for ceremony or battle. A wolf club made by Chief Matahga is carried by our sitting Mohegan Chief .

Displayed at Tantaquidgeon Museum, America’s Oldest Native-Owned and Operated Museum

Wolf Spoon1909 Mohegan

Wolf Spoon

Mohegan means wolf people. This wolf-headed spoon was held by Lucy Occum Tantaquidgeon (1733-1830), her daughter, Lucy Teecomwas (1753-1834), and her daughter, Cynthia Hoscott (1778-1855). These women offered their land for the founding of Mohegan Church in 1831. During the 1830’s Federal Indian Removal era, the Connecticut congressional delegation opposed Indian removal including the Cherokee Trail of Tears.

Displayed at Tantaquidgeon Museum, America’s Oldest Native-Owned and Operated Museum

700
Acres of Land Preservation
Baskets
Tell stories
2003
Became first Native American tribe in the US to own a professional sports team
“This heart is not mine, but yours.”
– Sachem Uncas
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