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Our Stories

Culture expressed through oral tradition tells a different and often deeper story than historic records can.

Oral tradition is a selective, yet democratic form of spoken record-keeping. Indigenous cultures pass down their oral traditions through select culture-bearers; these individuals have been trained since a young age to interpret their traditions. However, unlike written record-keepers (whose writings were and are still inaccessible to many), spoken records (when recited) are subject to the correction and refutation of an entire community -- whether the members are literate or not. Furthermore, stories passed down through oral tradition are fully understood by the story-keeper, enabling him or her to update archaic language and make the story more intelligible to succeeding generations.

1931
Tantaquidgeon Museum opens
Blue
Represents the sky and spirit
Fidelia Fielding
The last fluent speaker of the Mohegan language
9
Tribal Councilors
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